Stage 7: Acceptance

grief8

WE MADE IT!  At least in blog form (right??)!

This is the last step in all kinds of grief (to the best of my knowledge at the time of writing this) and in my *PERSONAL* opinion it can be the most difficult.  See, I am not really at this step yet with what I am going through.  Maybe some things I have come to accept, but as a whole, nope.

So how do I know how hard it can be?  My brother was murdered when I was 18, I was stuck in my grief for about 15 years.  I got through all of the rest of it, but I had to be able to accept a few facts before I could move forward emotionally:

  • My brother was murdered 2 days before my birthday in an extremely violent manner.
  • There was nothing I could have done to prevent it or save him.
  • I can not bring him back.
  • I can not turn back time.
  • The future we planned will NEVER come to pass.
  • I did not die that day, it just felt that way.

That is only six things.  I lost myself for a long time trying to wrap my head around those six things.  That is a long time for six things.

With medical issues, I expect it to take time to come to acceptance of all that has gone on and may never end.  It isn’t as final as death.  It can be a lifetime of being in multiple stages of mourning my losses, however, the goal is to spend just as much time celebrating the wins.  The positive attitude is what is going to keep me getting through each day until I can accept all that my body has to offer, good or bad.

If you have been blessed to make it to this stage you deserve a standing ovation.  I can’t imagine what you have gone through to get here, but I do hope that you spread encouragement to those who are in earlier stages of grief and can’t seem to move forward.  We look to you as a beacon of hope to us all; that we can learn to accept everything that has happened to us and live a quality life without dragging the weight of loss around.

 

I just want to thank everyone who read all of these posts, or even just this one.  My goal is to spread awareness about Chiari Malformation and whatever else I can help be noticed for the community of people who aren’t “normal” in the brain, body, or both.  We may look nice and act proper, but we often suffer behind closed doors or even in public when someone must make a comment about “how” we are.  We are people with feelings, family, friends, bills, pain, love, humor, thoughts, ideas, opinions, style, and so much more.  Some of us have to figure out all of that all over again, but we appreciate the people out there cheering us on and encouraging us to do more than we ever thought possible.

Again, the article I got this from is here and I used it as a basis for my drawings and for this idea in general.  Let’s talk about out mental health so we can be healthy.  Grief is healthy when completed and not stalled.  If you are having trouble with loss, talk to your PCP or therapist, or someone in your support system.  There are a lot of ways that help can be accessed and we need to use the avenues that have been opened to us so we can help ourselves and the future generations.  No Shame!

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