A Whole Life

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Chiari is not my whole life

However if you knew read my blogs or followed my social media it is easy to assume that all I do is sit around having Chiari all day and writing of my sufferings.  I hope that is not the way I come across, but a lot of my life has been medically related in the past few years, so it is a big part of my life.

I am sure that I have spent time talking about some of what I do at church, but I also have other things that I enjoy that I suppose I don’t always speak about.  Even I have to remember that pulling back the veil also means exposing how I spend time enjoying myself during difficult times and what I do between flareups.

At my laziest, I am watching Gumball on Hulu.  Just over and over.  At my best I take walks around my neighborhood and take pictures of people’s flowers.  I make videos, I play ukulele, I bake cookies.  I have a range of interests that is ever expanding as I crave information and knowledge.  One I am able to master something (which is almost impossible now, but it happens) I am ready to move forward and learn something new.

I just picked up a unicorn cross stitch project.  I have avoided cross stitch and needle point my whole life, and here I am, ready to learn.  I have been considering crocheting or knitting again.  I know that my fingers aren’t as nimble as they once were, but I will use them until they don’t move.  I am thankful for every bit of strength I have left.

Sketching, drawing, and painting have always been activities that I enjoy but I am not that great at.  The funny thing is that at this point I understand it is more for my enjoyment because I am not in the business of selling paintings.  I can enjoy my ugly paintings.

I have taken to watching Marvel Comic Universe movies and reading DC comic books.  Neither have ever been interesting to me, and they still aren’t really, but it gives me something to talk to other people about, so in that sense it is worth every minute I put into it.

Writing has become a necessary part of my life, so I have begun writing a book.  Still debating on publishing the one I wrote.  I just chaired our Chiari walk and I am plotting and planning, praying to get the right people in my path.  I am ready to start taking advocacy to another level and while I know I have a few obstacles to overcome, I know this is where I am supposed to be.

I suppose thinking about it, it is hard to see how all of these things are woven into my life along with the family, church, and so many doctors.  However, I encourage you to MAKE the time to do something that you enjoy for at least 30 minutes a day.  An hour if you have access to the time.  I usually can’t focus for more than an hour or so.  If I have a headache, maybe 15 minutes.  Always keep something with you that you can do to keep you mind functional during slumps in the day.  Some days I just play with my fidget dodecahedron (yes, I am THAT girl) because it requires zero thinking.  Other days I get on my 3Ds and play video games.  I can do it for about ten minutes before I tire of that!

There are so many options, even listening to audio books and just resting.  All of these things are great for helping to get through days that aren’t the best or the worst.  I look at what I go through just trying figure out what my brain is doing and I know that other people out there are going through the same or worse with less support or resources than I have.  My mission is to figure out how to change that so that people can get through these times with hope and purpose in their lives.

 

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The Pain Is Everywhere

This is a point in my journey I could not have predicted. I have never considerd myself a “happy” person, but I have always felt that I had some direction and motivation.  

The loss of my job, my memory, and some of my higher functioning has left me feeling robbed.  Chiari has stolen the things about myself that made me feel like my life had value to me or made me feel valuable.  

The hard part is staying transparent.  I began this journey so that those who came behind me would have a record of the trials I faced in case theit situation was similar to my own.  

I have a complicated history that involves some childhood horrors and now I have lost my coping mechanisms (work, work, work, work, work).  So, at my neuropsych evaluation it was recommended that I go into long-term therapy with a PhD level psychologist because now I have to work through my current life change and wade through my past so it can be fixed.  

That sounds reasonable.  Still, on the inside it drives me into an anxiety attack just thinking about it.  I don’t want to re-live that part of my life, but in a way I already am.  I feel just as trapped and hopeless as I did when I was a child, but with the added bonus of having my own child and remembering independence. 

Slowly, the enjoynents of my life are fading.  I am checking in less often.  The neuropsych eval stated that my intelligence surpasses 99% of people in my age range.  At times, I have the clarity to see that I am severly depressed and I am getting worse quickly.  I recognize the trail of red flags that my mind is desperately flinging all over, anywhere someone will look.  

That is why I have chosen to keep my battle as public as possible (without incriminating anyone or tarnishing anyone’s reputation) because it is time to stop being ashamed.  We are not ashamed of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, broken bones, or any other health problem.  We should not be ashamed if our brains aren’t functioning well either.  

So, this is why there have not been any updates.  I haven’t cared enough to do any.  I have barely cared enough to get up every day and pretend like I want to be here.  I hope that as I go through treatment, this cartoon with flourish and once again be what I created it to be.  A mockery of the crazy things people aay to me. 

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“I can’t believe it’s been a whole year!  I just got a promotion, what have you been doing?”                                     “Surviving!”

The world at large does not have a thorough understanding of recovering from brain surgery.  While their lives breeze by marked by accomplishments and milestones, my days are monotonous and almost indistinguishable from one another.  My memory started fading over a year ago, and I only have vague recollections of what has been going on in my life.  I have not achieved anything, and it makes for very awkward conversations.

Dreaming…

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Dreaming the dream!

Life is full of dreams.  They change and mature as we grow and sometimes when we are on the cusp of achievement, the dream dies.  I felt this way last year when my doctor told me I would need brain surgery.  Everything that I had worked for was snatched from my hand and I was left with what felt like nothing.  I could no longer sing arias or even hold my guitar.  And when I could hold the guitar, my fingers wouldn’t always cooperate.  After surgery, I got a ukulele to help me with retraining my fingers to listen to my brain.  It has been the most comforting item during this period of my life.  When everyone is sleep and I am wide awake, I can sing and play and feel like my voice is still relevant.  I may never go back to school.  I may never perform a solo again.  I may never be what I thought I would be.  I will sing though, and I will imagine all the people whose hearts I could have touched.